MONITORS (which ones do people like)

What monitors do people like?

I have some random gaming one, but it’s 2560x1440 which is a really nice resolution for Flame.

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I use LG 27UD88 as my GUI monitor and NEC P241 as my broadcast one. Happy with both of them.

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An Eizo CG318-4K on the Flame

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I’m using the Benq Sw271 for “broadcast”. I’ve only had it a couple days and I like it but I honestly can’t say if it’s accurate. I like it because it uses a hardware LUT for calibration and it has this handy remote control for switching between modes.

As far as GUI monitor, I went with HP z27. It’s ok. Definitely needed calibrating and it has darkness at the edges. I would return it if not for the annoyance of that process.

I really wrestled with the choice of getting an ultra wide for GUI but it ended up being an easy choice once I went into B&H and looked at them in person. There would be way too big of a headturn to look back and forth between the widescreen GUI screen and broadcast screen. Do that 600 times a day and I’d be in physical therapy before too long.

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Dayum I love those Eizos! They cost more than my car!

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I’m running dual Dell u3219qs and love them. I do like the look and features of the BenQ 3220s and would but that next for a broadcast.

And part 2: what are the features you like that differentiate these monitors from a 4k IPS monitor that costs $300. From the specs alone it’s not clear to me.

Calibratability?
Better uniformity?
Viewing Angle?
Contrast ratio?

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4K. 32 inches. Got good reviews on Wirecutter. Built in kvm. Built in Picture in Picture. I like Dell like @greg likes HP Calculators. And it was 800 ish.

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I have the 27-inch LG UltraFine 5K Display. It seems to do the trick. https://www.apple.com/shop/product/HMUB2LL/A/lg-ultrafine-5k-display

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I second the Benq Sw271. Got one off of their refurbished site and saved a few hundred.

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What? BenQ refurbished??? I had no idea! Brilliant tip!

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And now you’ve saved me money too! Thanks Dave!

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If we discussing about SDR monitors:
Lets start with viewing angle, its almost the same on modern IPS panels. MVA/PVA and TNfilm panels shouldnt be used for any color critical work, and OLED is also questionable (its fine for client monitoring). If your monitor manufacturer uses any type of polarising film for “better viewing angle” it will not do any difference in a real world scenario because you will look straight to your monitor 99.9% of a time, but it can give you a little bit better contrast ratio. Contrast ratio should be at least 800 to 1 AFTER calibration and uniformity compensation (if needed). Most displays with standard sRGB gamut that cost more then 500 USD (Im talking Ukrainian prices here, should be cheaper in US) will give you such a results. Next is calibration - every monitor can (and should) be calibrated. Period. Dont trust any “factory pre calibration” papers shipped with your monitor. It doesnt work this way. Do you need hardware calibration or not - If your software is colormanaged you will be perfectly fine with software solution, if not - stick with hardware one (with color managed software it will be hardware/software calibration hybrid anyway). Flame is colormanaged on Mac, and non colormanaged on Linux (at least last time I checked, it was 2019 version) And what remains is uniformity - thats a big thing. Almost all cheap (read non Eizo/NEC pro series) wide gamut monitors have a big uniformity problems. And it cant be corrected, corrected, exapt uniformity compensation technology, that kills your display contrast ration, in some cases to unusable, on some models it didnt work with hardware calibration, and can have other problems. So Id say - unoformity is most important one, all other thing can be fixed to a certain extent. Good news is that unoformity is easy to check without any measuring instruments. Set your monitor to its native gamut. Fill whole screen with white color (windows explorer or mac finder should do the trick if you not having white frame in your disposal). Set brightness to higher value (I would say to 70 if brightness setting can be set between 0 to 100). Close your eyes. Wait a little, like 10 seconds or so. Open your eyes, and look closely to your monitor. If your mind will tell you something wrong - one side is darker than other, or more importantly one side of monitor has some tint (usualy its green on one side and magenta on the other) - dont buy, or return it. If your eyes dont see any troubles - you good to go.

Hope this helps.

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This is super helpful, thank you!

I’ve had the 30" NEC PA302 for a few years and it’s been great - I especially love that it’s 16:10 aspect, 2560x1600, because you can view an HD clip at 100% zoom in batch/timeline, something that’s annoyingly not quite possible on 16:9 2560x1440. You can hardware calibrate it to Rec709 and not have to worry about software colour profiles/wide gamut problems which is frankly a blessing…

They’ve discontinued it this year but a friend has the 4k sister model which is also fantastic, I really rate NECs as an Eizo alternative.

I’m tempted to look into using a big 4k OLED as a computer monitor when I next upgrade - the most recent LGs have pretty decent primaries, contrast and viewing angle, but I’m not totally sold on whether they do the dimming thing that plasmas used to do when you hit them with 100% white, which feels very weird for a UI display. And possible burn-in problems. Sitting a bit further away from an absolutely massive display leaving loads of desk space free really appeals tho :slight_smile:

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I use an Eizo CG279X, love the color navigator 7 feature, great quality monitor.
Unfortunately can’t add a link but check the Eizo site for all the features.

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Welcome and thanks @Gavin! Sorry about the inability to post a link as Trust Level 0…that’s something that keeps robots and spammers from spamming the forums with garbage. Thanks for being here and you’ve been promoted so you can post links from here on out. :slight_smile:

Hey Randy,
Thanks for that, love this, congrats on getting it going.

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Our pleasure. Thanks for showing up and sharing!

I use an ASUS PA329C. It has a 32" UHD panel that calibrates nicely and hits 100% of Rec709/DCI-P3 and over 80% of 2020. The important thing is to make sure to turn off local dimming which is it’s main weak point.

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